Assassin’s Creed III

Overall, Assassin’s Creed III has more content than the average gamer is able to handle. Unfortunately, that overwhelming amount of tasks and the nice design of its overworld are terribly marred by a central quest that is more focused on telling a story than providing players with an exciting gaming experience. It has its moments and it features a very solid group of side-missions that pushes players to explore its world, but the outcome is a title that falls far away from the level reached by its direct predecessor and successor alike.

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Yoshi’s Woolly World

Yoshi’s Woolly World arrives to drastically alter that scenario, for it catapults the green dinosaur’s franchise to a level of awe-inducing quality it had not known for quite a while. The franchise’s first home console entry in eighteen years is, unquestionably, its brightest installment in two decades. It is an assessment that might not carry much weight considering the pile of average software that separates it from the series’ crayon-infused Super Nintendo inception, so its prowess is perhaps best summed up by declaring it is a title that often dares to be as good as Yoshi’s Island.

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Lego City Undercover

All in all, Lego City Undercover is a stellar third-party exclusive, and TT Fusion has done well in utilizing the system’s unique controller either as a map, or as a scanner that when aimed towards the screen allows Chase to investigate his surroundings. It is a game that has over twenty hours of extra content to go along with its fifteen-hour main quest. Its few core issues are directly related to the line of games it belongs to, and how some of its quirks did not adjust so well to the vast ambitious project that is Lego City. Other than that, the game is blessed with the same charm, silly humor and great cutscenes – this time with full voice acting – that have always been such an important component of the Lego games.

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Super Mario Maker

Super Mario Maker is, then, a huge repository of platforming goodness that can be easily navigated and that never stops renewing its content. From a value standpoint, at least, it is undoubtedly the strongest entry of the Mario franchise, and as long as talented users keep on producing new creative courses that either follow the property’s traditional design rules or bend them in incredibly inventive ways, it will keep on delivering refreshing gameplay. However, while the user-creation component is what makes the cogs of the game’s engine turn frantically, it also happens to be its Achilles’ heel.

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The Wonderful 101

In the end, though, instead of causing players to pity the title, those financial restrictions make The Wonderful 101 even more fantastic, because – most of the time – it is a very nicely produced game. The fifteen hours of its main quest are complemented by lots of great collectibles, not to mention the adjustable difficulty and the true challenge of getting great ranks on all the missions. The game strikes a surprising and unique balance, especially for the genre it is filed under, between gameplay and stellar storytelling, and its combat system is extremely well-built.

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Splatoon

When the battle begins, though, all minor issues that surround Splatoon are promptly forgotten. As those mad artists armed with a myriad of weapons start painting scenarios that were originally a pale canvas, Nintendo reaches for the kind of fun and competition found in the company’s other two multiplayer giants: Mario Kart and Super Smash Bros. It is arguable, however, that Splatoon attains competitiveness in a much smoother and smarter way than that enormous pair, because while both of those titles embrace rookies and experts alike and try to give them equal chances to win through the creation of devices that allow those on the losing end to suddenly raise their chances of victory, Splatoon achieves the same with pure built-in balance.

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Kirby And The Rainbow Curse

From the outset one thing becomes obvious: Kirby and the Rainbow Curse is so adorable some players might report the witnessing of rainbows and candy popping out of their TV sets and making their way into their living rooms. The short opening sequence could have come out of an unbelievably masterfully produced stop-motion animation flick where everything is made of very colorful clay, and that art style pours right into the game itself where levels and enemies are seemingly made from that same material.

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Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker

Captain Toad is one fearless fellow. Part of a race that displays an incredible ineptitude to either partake in grand quests or deal with bad guys, the little mushroom man is further hindered by the fact he, like any experienced treasure hunter, carries a backpack of overpowering weight. Yet, regardless of being unable to run very fast, jump, or beat enemies directly, he presses forward magnificently powered by his love for adventuring and shiny loot. Armed with nothing but his unshakable determination, he must make his way through over sixty levels that come together to form an adventure of uncanny charm and brilliant design.

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Super Smash Bros. For Wii U

The care and attention to detail showcased in most Nintendo games are usually considered proof of the company’s – and its workers’ – love for gaming and of their respect towards their consumers. If that is true, then Super Smash Bros. For Wii U is the biggest labor of love ever released by the Big N. It might not be their best game, even if it is certainly the franchise’s brightest entry, but no title ever published by the company has ever oozed with so much dedication and effort.

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Bayonetta 2

The elegant lady in black comes out to play with one thing clear in her mind: in order to surpass her prior adventure, she needs to be flashier and more ambitious than ever. And that is precisely what happens. Bayonetta 2 is bigger and better. It wisely assumes that anyone coming into this second adventure has already gone through the earth-shattering clashes of its predecessor, and then it proceeds to pick up right from where it left off.

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