Crash Bandicoot 4: It’s About Time

What is astonishing is that despite all of its anger-inducing shortcomings, Crash Bandicoot 4: It’s About Time cannot be ignored completely. As a testament to the clever ideas it holds and to the seemingly timeless originality of the franchise, there is still some fun to be had by traversing all of its stages. This is a game whose heart is pure and unaltered platforming goodness coming straight out of the sidescrolling era; yet, keeping true to the trilogy that preceded it, that classic approach to the genre is wisely augmented thanks to various possibilities opened up by the added third dimension. Crash Bandicoot 4: It’s About Time moves the franchise forward by gifting the marsupial hero with a quartet of gameplay-altering skills and by giving him the helping hand of three new playable characters that get their own stages. These are additions that, by all means, work wonderfully; what does not click, however, is how the game frequently mishandles its elevated difficulty, creating a quest that is a constant struggle between fun and annoyance. The winner of that conflict varies greatly, and the end result is a product that frustrates for what it is and for what it could have been.

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Crash Team Racing Nitro-Fueled

There are plenty of complaints that can be throw at Crash Team Racing Nitro-Fueled. Save for the lack of polish exhibited by its wild jumps in difficulty, though, none of them are significant enough to hold the title back; and even in that case, it is possible to look on the bright side to see this excellent remake as a racing title that contains a magnitude of challenge that succeeds in pushing even the most skilled players to the very edge of their abilities. Everywhere else, the title shines as one of the strongest entries in the genre, achieving notable positions in the amount of content it sports, in the sheer depth of its demanding mechanics, and in the impressive variety of modes it has. And due to those awe-inspiring qualities, the frustrations that are bound to rise from the occasional encounters with absurd AI behavior are likely to come off as situations that can be overlooked in favor of the chance to appreciate the considerable achievement in kart racing that Crash Team Racing Nitro-Fueled is.

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Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy

Born during a generation when linear progression among tridimensional platformers was rare, Crash N. Sane Trilogy arrives to discover a market where its gameplay style is now in vogue. And, as a consequence of its irregularity, if gamers want to experience adventures that have an old-school obstacle-clearing nature inside 3-D scenarios, there are certainly a good number of far better options than the three games included in the package. That, however, does not mean this remastered trilogy amounts to a bad purchase. Whether one has nostalgic memories tied to the character’s Playstation titles or has only heard of the energetic marsupial and the mark he left in the gaming lives of those who grew up with the system, there is – to different degrees, obviously – enjoyment to be found here. The original Crash Bandicoot reveals itself to be a rather problematic effort, one that is more anger-inducing than it is fun, but Cortex Strikes Back and Warped are solid platformers with a lot of charm and content. Their age may occasionally jump forward, but classic platforming, when done right, has a gripping nature that is hard to erode, and in Crash N. Sane Trilogy it is still pretty vivid, even if it is at times clouded by a few issues.

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