Kid Icarus: Of Myths And Monsters

That mixture of failed attempts at improvements, lackluster technical enhancements, missed opportunities, and blatant copying makes Kid Icarus: Of Myths and Monsters be notably unremarkable. Perhaps, to those who did not go through the original, there is some fun to found in how the game combines platforming and shooting while underlining those elements with an RPG component that works in nice synergy with the title’s core gameplay. However, even to those players, the NES debut of Pit’s saga is far more recommendable, for – regardless of its higher difficulty – it feels more full-fledged. There is little that Kid Icarus: Of Myths and Monsters does better than its older brother, and the adventure does not show a lot of effort when it comes to growing past its predecessor. The result is underwhelming, as the game lands on a weird ledge that stands between the land of uninspired sequels and the realm of unimproved remakes.

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Kid Icarus

Without so many sources of overwhelming frustration and points that reveal technical inconsistence, Kid Icarus could have been hailed as a classic upon its original release and still hold that status until the present day. As it stands, however, it is a game that, albeit good, has to be tackled with patience and willingness to overlook its rough edges. Its mixture of platforming and shooting is remarkable, and it is even more engaging due to how the adventure offers rewards to those who are efficient in the killing of enemies. Additionally, its gameplay variations, which include dungeons of The Legend of Zelda inspiration as well as stages that scroll sideways and upwards, keep it fresh and entertaining all the way through. Because of that, although it is understandable the franchise was kept for so long in a limbo, it is also slightly sad Nintendo temporarily abandoned the unique formula, in both gameplay and mythological theme, they uncovered with the title. Just like it deserved a shot at modern stardom with a new installment, Kid Icarus also deserves to be played by a contemporary audience; even if not everyone will make it to its end, the game has enough quality and flexibility to hold some value to a wide and varied public.

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Kid Icarus: Uprising

It is safe to say that Pit has successfully found his place among the strong cast of modern videogame heroes. The days of up-scrolling levels might be sadly over, but by combining addictive shoot’em up segments with meticulous and slow exploration, the character has encountered a restarting point for his adventures that, while not extremely original in neither of its two instances, still manages to be unique.

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