Tag Archives: Switch

Oceanhorn: Monster of Uncharted Seas Review

It is clear, therefore, that Oceanhorn: Monster of Uncharted Seas exists in a rather tight balance. If on one hand it is indeed an enjoyable game that will hold the attention of kids and adults alike throughout its duration, even luring some of them into tackling all of its secrets; on the other hand it is clearly far from the best experience of its kind, as it chooses to neatly follow in the footsteps of a franchise that simply cannot be beaten at what it does. Had it taken a more subversive approach to some gameplay aspects or opted to carve out a feature it could call its own, Oceanhorn could have easily excelled. But as the path it takes is that of a pretty blatant clone, it merely entertains while it lasts. Nevertheless, it cannot be denied that the Finnish Cornfox & Bros. pay a good enough homage to The Legend of Zelda and give one heart-warming nod to one of its most remarkable outings, the unforgettable The Wind Waker.

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ARMS Review

Ultimately, ARMS is Nintendo’s purest take on the fighting genre, mostly respecting the essence of one-on-one combats but doing so by adding a clever twist that makes it unmistakably a Nintendo product. And true to the tradition of the games that have walked out of the company’s Kyoto studios, it does not achieve universal appeal by a mindless dumbing down of a gaming style, but via its reconstruction with small bricks that amount to a structure that is far more than its individual parts let on.

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Snake Pass Review

Given that matter, Snake Pass is a game that is easy to recommend, but as long as there is a large caveat attached to its back. By moving away from the bipedal characters that dominate the platforming landscape, the game is practically the discovery of a hidden subgenre, one that seamlessly mixes the challenges of getting across chasms, gathering items, and climbing to high places with the reasoning involved in puzzle games. It breaks away from the mold by forcing players – quite literally – to think and move like a snake, altering the way with which problems that are nearly as old as gaming itself need to be approached. Without its checkpoint-placement shortcomings, Snake Pass would be a game that could embrace all kinds of players, regardless of the paradigm-breaking it requires; with it, though, it becomes a title that asks for more patience and perseverance than it should have. Those who endure, however, will be in for quite a treat.

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Born Under Punches

Where most fighting games rely on baffling combinations of buttons, ARMS leans on actions (punching, blocking, rushing, moving, jumping, grabbing, and dashing) that demand the execution of a simple move or the press of a sole button (depending on the control scheme of choice). And where those game thrive in complicated combos, ARMS just asks its players to study the quirks of each of its characters, dive into the effects of its dozens of arms, pick the set that suits them best, and use creativity and fast-thinking on the rings to employ the simple actions the fighters can perform in ways that are appropriate to the situations they will find themselves in.

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E3 2017: Thoughts and Words

If during E3 2016 Nintendo did not have much to show other than The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, which was pretty understandable given the colossal impact the game had, E3 2017 was a quite different scenario. Looking to power the Switch through its first year of life while keeping the flame of its sales phenomenon pretty well-fed with oxygen, and trying to show gamers that the 3DS is still a system that will receive their support, the company gave fans quite a bit to look forward to. Games that were still unknown to the general public were revealed, and upcoming projects whose names have been written on people’s calendars for quite a while were further detailed.

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Snipperclips Review

Snipperclips has clear room for improvement in a few key areas, but the quality and cleverness of its concept are just too big to be denied, and the wonderful multiplayer sessions the game produces make it easy for one to overlook its flaws. As the initial exploration of a brilliant idea, it may not take it as far as it undoubtedly could, but it does a pretty great job at making it materialize in a game that is full of charm and engaging levels. And even though it is not a game that could only have been made for the Nintendo Switch – as its gameplay would be easily portable to other platforms – it succeeds in understanding what the console is about and using its notable features to its own benefit. Snipperclips is a launch title with a Nintendo touch for a Nintendo platform, and it is hard to ask for any more than that.

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The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild Review

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is, then, not a continuation, but a new and exciting beginning. From this point onwards, it becomes the guiding light that will illuminate the path of not only future Zelda installments but also of any open-world game. Surely, there is room for improvement, as the Zelda aspect of the game could have been a little bit meatier in order to offer a more significant counterbalance to its open-world tendencies. However, the existence of such shortcomings does not – in the slightest – mean Breath of the Wild is disappointing; it actually makes anyone who goes through its adventure become thoroughly excited for the road that lies open up ahead. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild may not be a pioneer, for it borrows more than it creates, but by taking two gameplay styles – open-world and Zelda – to their very apex by joining them, it earns the right to be called a classic and to become one of those tall poles that divide history into two parts: what came before it and what will come next.

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