Sonic And All-Stars Racing Transformed

Often, when a good game of the kart racing genre hits a Nintendo platform early on, it tends to be labeled as a title that exists for the purpose of temporarily satisfying any racing needs that players might have until Mario Kart comes around. Although it pales in comparison to the marvelous Mario Kart 8 – especially on the multiplayer front, Sonic and All-Stars Racing Transformed is still a very good buy due to its clever three-vehicle mechanics and its huge single-player value. It features tons of content, which aside from simply racing includes over 100 collectible stickers that serve as awards for the completion of achievements, a nice degree of vehicle customization, and a huge load of the undeniable charm of the most popular Sega franchises. Put some good level of challenge in there, which is sometimes unfortunately done cheaply, and you have a lasting, fun and rewarding title.

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Star Fox Zero

In the end, the magic of Star Fox is that it is always exciting. When first stepping into the game, the challenge of its missions make up for an adrenaline-filled ride to even the most experienced gamers. After a while, when clearing the missions becomes automatic, the thrill lies in the fact that players will delight in pushing themselves to maximizing the number of downed enemy ships so that absurdly high scores can be reached. In Star Fox Zero, that first wave of excitement is diluted because it is sometimes overwhelmed by the initially convoluted control scheme. But the fact remains that it is hard to find a gaming experience this invariably thrilling; even in the face of its many flaws, in the long run Star Fox Zero is a game that endlessly yields a constant rush of excitement that is unparalleled and that is bound to keep players coming back for more.

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The Return Of The Fantastic Mr. Fox

Star Fox Zero’s problems and its lack of creativity to develop a full package of settings, dialogues, and bosses of its own instead of borrowing a lot of elements from Star Fox 64 are blatant. However, it is unquestionably a game with far more qualities than virtues; a title that fully understands what is the essence of the series and then tries to implement it as well as possible. Its new ideas do not uniformly succeed, but its structural overhaul – with a Story Mode where players can, after unlocking the levels, freely select which one they want to tackle; and an Arcade Mode where the Star Fox 64 joy of aiming for high overall scores in individual runs from Corneria to Venom is recreated – show that this simple formula, when correctly captured, still works quite well in contemporary gaming.

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New Super Mario Bros. U

At first glance, New Super Mario Bros. U does not seem to do justice to the past Mario games that debuted alongside new Nintendo systems, as it is devoid of any visual leaps or visible gameplay improvements. In the end, though, it is certainly worthy of carrying that legacy forward, not only because, in a way, it set the parameters for how the Wii U’s social components could be integrated into a game, even one belonging to a genre in which such a connection is hard to establish; but, most importantly, because of how ridiculously fun it is.

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Xenoblade Chronicles X

Never has a game been this big, intricate, and ambitious; and rarely has a title offered as much content. Xenoblade Chronicles X is an amazing package that pulls players into a marvelous world within which they can exist and survive for more than one hundred hours. It has details and developments scattered all around its world and its missions, and the bits of satisfaction that it drops as gamers sink deeper and deeper into Mira make the effort and dedication it demands more than worthy. It is an unrelenting source of joy and wonder; a title that serves as a prime example of how gaming is capable of crafting full-fledged parallel universes into which we can gladly walk and explore for hours, plunging into a reality whose amazingly detailed and appealing mysteries are an endless pit of motivation.

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Home Away From Home

Xenoblade Chronicles X, aware that fans of the saga wanted a mixture of more-of-the-same with bigger and better mechanics, delivers precisely that. However, where Xenoblade Chronicles was a JRPG covered in an MMO cloak; Xenoblade Chronicles X further embraces the tendencies of massively multiplayer online games and becomes an MMO dressed up in a beautiful JRPG garb. Freedom and exploration are taken to a whole new degree, and not simply because Xenoblade X features what is the biggest and, possibly, better-crafted world to ever appear in a videogame; the core reason that tide shifts so heavily has to do with the game’s design itself, for – differently from what had happened in Xenoblade Chronicles – the focus is not the main plot, but the thousands of ornaments and surround it.

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Assassin’s Creed III

Overall, Assassin’s Creed III has more content than the average gamer is able to handle. Unfortunately, that overwhelming amount of tasks and the nice design of its overworld are terribly marred by a central quest that is more focused on telling a story than providing players with an exciting gaming experience. It has its moments and it features a very solid group of side-missions that pushes players to explore its world, but the outcome is a title that falls far away from the level reached by its direct predecessor and successor alike.

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Yoshi’s Woolly World

Yoshi’s Woolly World arrives to drastically alter that scenario, for it catapults the green dinosaur’s franchise to a level of awe-inducing quality it had not known for quite a while. The franchise’s first home console entry in eighteen years is, unquestionably, its brightest installment in two decades. It is an assessment that might not carry much weight considering the pile of average software that separates it from the series’ crayon-infused Super Nintendo inception, so its prowess is perhaps best summed up by declaring it is a title that often dares to be as good as Yoshi’s Island.

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Lego City Undercover

All in all, Lego City Undercover is a stellar third-party exclusive, and TT Fusion has done well in utilizing the system’s unique controller either as a map, or as a scanner that when aimed towards the screen allows Chase to investigate his surroundings. It is a game that has over twenty hours of extra content to go along with its fifteen-hour main quest. Its few core issues are directly related to the line of games it belongs to, and how some of its quirks did not adjust so well to the vast ambitious project that is Lego City. Other than that, the game is blessed with the same charm, silly humor and great cutscenes – this time with full voice acting – that have always been such an important component of the Lego games.

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