Xenoblade Chronicles 3

Xenoblade Chronicles 3 is quite simply one of the most ambitious projects to ever come out of Nintendo’s pipeline. With it, Monolith Soft further solidifies its property as one of the biggest representatives of the genre, taking almost everything that made its two predecessors feel magnificent to new heights. The world is not just the biggest one yet, but it is also intricately designed; the art style is vivid yet sober, achieving an immaculate level of quality; the plot’s tone is alluringly bleak; the customization options are unbelievably deep; the cutscenes are abundant, brilliantly directed, and greatly dramatic; the protagonists are the best in the saga by a very large margin; and the full-fledged nature of the more than one hundred sidequests threatens to set a new very high standard for the industry as a whole. As such, Xenoblade Chronicles 3 safely qualifies as one of the best RPGs of all time, and its mixture of exploration, battling, and questing goes straight to the history books to serve as a blueprint for the future of the genre.

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Xenoblade Chronicles 2

It is glorious, it is huge, it is sometimes overwhelming, and it is bound to make many players spend more than one hundred hours in Alrest uncovering all the world’s secrets. Whether one has played the original game or not, anyone willing to ignore a few flaws and to devote their brains and energy to figure out and slowly grasp the sheer magnificence of Xenoblade Chronicles 2 will be rewarded. They will be greeted with visuals that could be shown at a surrealistic exhibition; they will be accompanied by a masterful soundtrack that could enchant a packed and traditional concert hall if played by an orchestra; and they will be sucked into a universe whose angst and driving forces mirror our own in more ways than one would expect. Xenoblade Chronicles 2 may not be a shining gem of invariably sober tone and immaculate design, but its grandeur and ambitions are quite a wonder.

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Xenoblade Chronicles

The ultimate question is, does Xenoblade only set itself apart from other JRPGs, or does it climb higher than that? It is hard to tell whether or not its clear attempt to refresh the genre will be a success, after all, it is a matter of if other games will walk on some of its footsteps or if they will keep their occasional annoying habits as the norm.

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